Factors influencing Malaria prevention and control practices among pregnant women residing in slum areas in southern Ghana

Humphrey Kofie, University of Ghana
Mavis Dako-Gyeke, University of Ghana

This study examined factors that influence malaria prevention and control practices among pregnant women residing in two slum areas in Southern Ghana. Of particular interest was the relationship between the malaria prevention and control practices of pregnant women and their religious beliefs, socio-cultural norms, and economic status. Data was collected through face-to-face interviews via structured questionnaires. Descriptive, chi-square and correlation statistics were used to analyze the data. The findings revealed no statistically significant relationship between respondents’ religious beliefs and their malaria prevention and control practices. However, there was a statistically significant relationship between respondents’ economic status and their malaria prevention and control practices. Additionally, there was a statistically significant relationship between respondents’ socio-cultural norms and their malaria prevention and control practices. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended that anti malaria campaigns should be better targeted by government and other stakeholders so that the poor can gain access to prevention and treatment.

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Presented in Poster Session 1

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